Find out how a funeral plan can help your loved ones cover the costs after you’re gone.

If funeral costs continue to rise at current rates, by 2018 the average cost of a funeral will be over £4,300*. That could reach as much as £12,000 in 15 years’ time.

The National Funeral Cost Index 2017 revealed that one in six people said they’d struggled with funeral costs, with bereaved families taking on an average debt of £1,680. One in four people had to borrow money from friends and family to pay for a loved one’s send-off.

The alarming rate of these rises is just one reason why pre-paid funeral plans are becoming more and more popular in the UK. By purchasing a funeral plan now you can guarantee to have the funeral director fees and services paid in full at no extra cost to you or your next of kin, regardless of how much they may have risen to at the time of need. With flexible ways to pay, you can pay monthly over several years.

Pre-paid funeral plans secure the cost of funeral director fees at today’s prices. Avalon’s funeral plans, for example, cover all the elements of the service provided directly by the funeral director.

Avalon’s pre-paid funeral plans are available to customers in the UK, Spain, Cyprus and Portugal. With a range of plans offering different levels of cover, you can find the plan that’s right for you and your family.

A funeral plan also lets you arrange your funeral in advance, making important decisions about how you’d like to be laid to rest. You can record any funeral wishes or requests and Avalon will pass these on to the funeral director at the time of need.

Whether you want a particular song or hymn, or want everyone to wear bright colours, your loved ones will know that it’s exactly how you wanted to be remembered.

Find out more about Avalon Funeral Plans.

 

*Average of quotes for standard cremation and burial arrangements from a sample of UK Funeral Directors. Mintel Research Consultancy, June 2013. This is based on the assumption that in the future, funeral prices will continue to rise at the same annual rate seen over the last nine years from 2004 to 2013.